Preventing Elderly Financial Abuse

By | Food for thought

A recent study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College concluded that many retirees who do not suffer from any cognitive impairment can still manage their money through their 70s and 80s.1 The study reports that financial capacity relies on accumulated knowledge and that knowledge stays mostly intact as we age.

However, the study points out that it generally is not a good idea to start managing financial decisions in your late 70s and 80s if you haven’t had experience doing this before — such as after the death of a spouse who handled the finances.2 We work closely with our clients to help them develop financial strategies designed to last a lifetime, with the goal of reducing the need to make dramatic financial changes later in life. However, we are here to address any questions or concerns of our clients no matter what stage of their financial planning. Please give us a call; we’re here to help.

Having a plan for late-stage financial management is important due to the increase in elderly financial fraud. With more than 45 million seniors in America, this is a large and tempting market for scammers. One study estimated that about 5 million older Americans are financially exploited each year. In New York state alone, allegations of elderly financial abuse spiked by more than 35 percent between 2010 and 2014.3

In response to this growing problem, several government regulatory agencies have stepped up efforts to help prevent and address elder financial abuse, including the following:

  • The SEC requires brokers to make “reasonable efforts” to identify a “trusted contact” for investment accounts and allows them to prevent the disbursement of funds from the account and notify the trusted contact if the broker suspects abuse.4
  • The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, or FINRA, set up a senior help line at 844-57-HELPS (844-574-3577)5
  • In 2016, four state legislatures approved a rule requiring advisors to notify adult protective services and state regulators if they detect abuse; 10 more states are expected to adopt similar rules this year, and three other states already had such rules in place.6

According to the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse, some of the most common ways the elderly are taken advantage of financially are: forging their signature; getting them to sign a deed, will or power of attorney through deception, coercion or undue influence; using their property or possessions without permission; and telemarketing scams. Some of the most likely perpetrators of elder financial abuse are: family members; predatory people who seek out vulnerable seniors; and unscrupulous business professionals.7 If you believe you are a victim of fraud, contact your local law enforcement, state agency on aging and/or a community senior services group.

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Anek Belbase and Geoffrey T. Sanzenbacher. Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. January 2017. “Cognitive Aging and the Capacity to Manage Money.” http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/cognitive-aging-and-the-capacity-to-manage-money/. Accessed June 22, 2017.

2 Ibid.

3 Christine Idzelis. Investment News. April 23, 2017. “Advisers on front lines in battle against financial abuse of the elderly.”  http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FEATURE/170339977. Accessed June 22, 2017.

4 Mark Schoeff Jr. Investment News. April 3, 2017. “Advisers taking steps to protect elderly.” http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FREE/170339979?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social. Accessed June 22, 2017.

5 FINRA. “FINRA Securities Helpline for Seniors.” http://www.finra.org/investors/highlights/finra-securities-helpline-seniors. Accessed June 22, 2017.

6 Mark Schoeff Jr. Investment News. April 3, 2017. “Advisers taking steps to protect elderly.” http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170403/FREE/170339979?utm_campaign=socialflow&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social. Accessed June 22, 2017.

7 National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse. “Financial Abuse.” http://www.preventelderabuse.org/elderabuse/fin_abuse.html. Accessed June 22, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Savings and Investment Updates

By | Planning

 

The American College of Financial Services recently posted some surprising results from its Retirement Income Literacy Quiz. Nearly three-quarters of respondents ages 60 to 75 failed the test with a score of 60 percent or less.1

The quiz included topics such as which expenses are covered by Medicare and long-term care insurance and what age people should start drawing benefits from Social Security. If you’re not familiar with the answers to questions such as these, we invite you to schedule a consultation so we can help you delve into retirement planning. There are many factors to consider beyond where to invest and how much you’ve saved. Retirement is about preserving and distributing assets, as well as understanding the impact of longevity.

Let’s take a look at some other retirement-oriented questions that are important to answer. For example, do you know how long you have to work for your company before you can keep matched contributions to your 401(k) plan? Some companies that sponsor a 401(k) require employees to work around two to three years before employer-matching contributions are vested. If you leave the company before then, those matches won’t be added to your account balance — even if you maintain the plan with that employer after you go to work for another one.2

It’s worth noting that 401(k) and other employer-sponsored retirement plans may be considered for tax reform. Recent discussions have included eliminating the tax-deferred status of retirement plan contributions, which represent a four-year tab of $583.6 billion that Congress could spend elsewhere. The discussions are in the very early stages, but things can happen quickly in Washington these days, so it’s an issue worth watching.3

For those in the military, on Jan. 1, 2018, the military’s new Blended Retirement System goes into effect. Starting that day, all military personnel whose length of service spans one to 12 years will have one year to make an irrevocable choice between the old and new retirement plans. Service members who started before 2006 will automatically remain in the old plan, which offers a generous pension complete with inflation adjustments. However, anyone joining the military starting next year gets enrolled automatically in the new program, which combines reduced pension benefits with up to a 5 percent match of personal contributions to the government’s Thrift Savings Plan (TSP).4

If you haven’t saved enough money to retire yet, you may be thinking you’ll just keep working until you have enough. However, according to a recent survey of 1,002 retirees, 60 percent said the timing of their retirement was unexpected, citing reasons such as health issues, job loss or the need to care for a loved one.5 While working longer is a worthy goal, it’s good to develop a financial plan that helps provide for possible contingencies just in case you have to pivot to “Plan B.”

 

 

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Walter Updegrave. Money. May 12, 2017. “Most Seniors Flunked a New Retirement Quiz. Could You Do Better?” http://time.com/money/4771461/retirement-quiz-pass-or-flunk/. Accessed May 12, 2017.

2 Emily Brandon. US News & World Report. May 8, 2017. “How Long Does It Take to Vest in a 401(k) Plan?” http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/401ks/articles/2017-05-08/how-long-does-it-take-to-vest-in-a-401-k-plan. Accessed May 12, 2017.

3 Suzanne Woolley. Bloomberg. May 3, 2017. “What Is Washington Doing to My 401(k) Tax Break?” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-05-03/what-is-washington-doing-to-my-401-k-tax-break. Accessed May 12, 2017.

4 Dan Kadlec. Money. May 10, 2017. “What U.S. Military Need to Know About Their New Retirement Plan.” http://time.com/money/4767777/military-blended-retirement-system-tips-new-calculator/. Accessed May 12, 2017.

5 Charisse Jones. USA Today. June 2, 2015. “60% of Americans Have to Retire Sooner Than They’d Planned.” https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2015/06/02/majority-of-americans-have-to-retire-sooner-than-theyd-planned/28371099/. Accessed June 2, 2017.

 

Our firm is not affiliated with the U.S. government or any governmental agency and does not provide federal benefits advice.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Kiplinger: Only You Can Prevent Portfolio Fires

By | Kiplinger

Know your comfort level when it comes to risk. If you’re feeling uneasy, there’s probably a good reason for it.

Everybody wants to make money, and nobody wants to lose it. Seems simple enough.

Unfortunately, there aren’t many financial vehicles that can offer that guarantee. Typically, to make enough money to live on in retirement, you must take some risks.

But if your financial professional is truly looking out for you, he’ll put as much focus on managing that risk as he does on helping you get the best returns.

Most planners will talk about risk tolerance and ask you questions about your age, your income, your net worth and when you hope to retire to determine your ability to handle market volatility. But there should be so much more to it than that. My firm has an acronym for our process – CAN: Capacity, Attitude, Need. You really can’t put together a workable financial plan without considering all three.  Click here for the full story.

How Much Money Do You Need To Retire?

By | Planning

How much money do you need to retire? That’s about as personal a question as, “What do you look for in a spouse?” or “What is your dream job?” The answer is different for everyone.

So are questions about when you want to retire, how you want to retire (suddenly or gradually) and where you want to retire. There are vast combinations of these and many other variables that serve to make the style and level of retirement different for every individual — even within the same household.

Americans are retiring at a rate of 10,000 per day, which means a lot of people need retirement planning advice.1Financial services firms like ours develop relationships with neighbors and friends in our local community to offer personalized guidance and advice on financial matters. If you’re pondering how much money you may need to retire, please come and see us. Not only can we help you with that assessment, we create financial strategies through the use of insurance and investment products to help you work toward your retirement goals.

Fidelity recently conducted a survey that yielded wildly divergent responses in terms of how much money people think they need to retire. For example, 25 percent think they will need to have saved two to three times their annual salary during their last year of full-time work, while many financial advisors say it’s more like 10 years’ worth of salary saved. Overall, 74 percent of Americans underestimate how much they will need for a comfortable retirement.2

It’s important to keep in mind that issues may arise even if you’ve saved an appropriate amount for your household by the time you retire. Some circumstances — such as the unexpected death of one spouse before the other — could expose the need to replace a lost source of income. This is a possible circumstance where buying a life insurance policy, even long after your children have grown up and are on their own, may still be a part of your overall financial strategy, depending on your personal circumstances. At a minimum, one of the two Social Security benefits the couple was receiving will stop when one spouse dies. A life insurance payout can help augment any lost Social Security or pension benefits to help a surviving spouse maintain his or her current standard of living throughout retirement.3

While some retirement factors are personal, others may be cultural in nature. The most current available data shows that in the U.S., the average white family has more than $130,000 in retirement savings while the average African American household has only $19,000. Over time, disparities in income and personal wealth have an even more dramatic impact: By the time they enter their 60s, whites have accumulated 11 times more in savings than African Americans — on average at least $1 million more in wealth.4

Unequal pay and career opportunities also may impact a woman’s ability to save enough for retirement. To complicate matters further, women tend to live longer. A couple estimating how much they need to retire may make the assumption that they’ll need, for example, 25 years of retirement income. The husband might pass away after 15 years while the wife lives another 15 years on her own. However, their income plan may not reflect a loss of income sources once the husband dies nor increased expenses the surviving wife may incur in her later years of life.5

If you’re interested in estimating about how much money you may need to save each year, try out an online retirement calculator, like this one provided by the U.S. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA).6 You also can contact us to schedule a more in-depth retirement analysis.

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Insured Retirement Institute. 2016. “Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2016.” https://www.myirionline.org/docs/default-source/research/boomer-expectations-for-retirement-2016.pdf. Accessed April 28, 2017.
2 Lee Barney. Plan Sponsor. March 6, 2017. “Most People Think They Will Need a Paltry Amount for Retirement.” http://www.plansponsor.com/Most-People-Think-They-Will-Need-a-Paltry-Amount-for-Retirement/?fullstory=true. Accessed April 28, 2017.
3 Jamie Hopkins. Forbes. April 27, 2017. “Why Life Insurance Is Essential for Retirement Planning.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiehopkins/2017/04/27/why-life-insurance-is-essential-for-retirement-planning/#78b4ee9f31cd. Accessed April 28, 2017.
4 Rodney Brooks. Chicago Defender. April 28, 2017. “The African American Retirement Planning Gap.” https://chicagodefender.com/2017/04/28/the-retirement-crisis-facing-african-americans/. Accessed April 28, 2017.
5 LeAnn Bjerken. Spokane Journal of Business. April 27, 2017. “Women face unique challenges in retirement planning.” https://www.spokanejournal.com/local-news/women-face-unique-challenges-in-retirement-planning/. Accessed April 28, 2017.
6 FINRA. 2017. “Retirement Calculator.” http://apps.finra.org/calcs/1/retirement. Accessed April 28, 2017.

Life insurance policies are contracts between your client and an insurance company. Life insurance product guarantees rely on the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurer.

Financial calculators are designed as informational tools to help you estimate answers to common financial questions. They are not intended to predict future returns or results, nor do they represent the performance of any specific investment or product.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Will Power be Restored to the Coal Industry?

By | Food for thought

In March, President Donald Trump signed executive orders to rescind several regulations that were in place to limit pollution from mining and burning coal.1 The administration’s goal is to revive the coal mining industry, but the downside is coal emissions release more greenhouse gases than natural gas.2

These recent actions serve as a reminder that nearly every sector, no matter how reliable it has been in the past, goes through cycles of uncertainty. The utilities sector, for example, has long been recognized as a steady provider of dividend payments and thus is a popular instrument for retirement income.3

Like any industry, it has its ups and downs, which can affect an investor’s returns and income stream. That’s why we believe it’s generally a good idea to remain diversified, even within a historically reliable sector, to help mitigate risk. As financial professionals, we’re here to help you analyze your personal financial situation and create strategies utilizing a variety of investment and insurance products that can help you work toward your financial goals. Please remember that investing involves risk, including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

In 2016, natural gas (34 percent) surpassed coal (30 percent) as the country’s No. 1 source of energy for the first time in U.S. history. Nuclear power accounted for a 20 percent share of electricity generation. Renewable power sources, such as wind and solar power, are the fastest-growing power sources today, but they still represent only 8 percent.4

As for the future of coal, the CEO of the country’s third-largest coal mining company believes the industry will see most of its future gains not from policy changes, but from demand by China and South Korea. Last fall, these countries agreed to stop importing coal from North Korea, which was a boon for the U.S. industry.

The CEO for the U.S.’s largest public utility says his company closed many of its coal plants because it could produce energy at a lower cost with fewer facilities — not because of regulations. He also reiterated the company’s commitment to reducing carbon emissions by 60 percent by 2020. Having been raised near coal plants in Philadelphia, with coal cinders floating frequently through the air, he said he appreciates the great strides that have been made in clean air.6

While clean energy sources have a way to go before they become the more affordable choice, many experts believe that eventually will happen. When it does, it’s unlikely consumers or corporations would choose a more expensive option to fuel their electricity.

 

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 CNBC. March 28, 2017. “Coal can be more profitable and efficient going forward, expert says.” http://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/28/coal-can-be-more-profitable-and-efficient-going-forward-expert-says.html. Accessed April 25, 2017.

2 Ryan Handy. Houston Chronicle. Jan. 16, 2017. “Natural gas surpasses coal as fuel for power production.” http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Natural-gas-surpasses-coal-as-fuel-for-power-10861176.php. Accessed April 25, 2017.

3 Kira Brecht. U.S. News & World Report. Feb. 5, 2016. “Generate Income and Play Defense With Utility Stocks.” http://money.usnews.com/investing/articles/2016-02-05/generate-income-and-play-defense-with-utility-stocks. Accessed April 25, 2017.

4 Ryan Handy. Houston Chronicle. Jan. 16, 2017. “Natural gas surpasses coal as fuel for power production.” http://www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Natural-gas-surpasses-coal-as-fuel-for-power-10861176.php. Accessed April 25, 2017.

5 Michael Bastasch. Daily Caller. 2017. “Mining CEO Expects A Record Year For Coal Exports.” http://dailycaller.com/2017/04/14/mining-ceo-expects-a-record-year-for-coal-exports/. Accessed April 25, 2017.

6 Jonathan Matisse. Knoxville News Sentinel. April 19, 2017. “TVA CEO: Coal plants not reopening under Trump.” http://www.knoxnews.com/story/money/business/2017/04/19/tva-ceo-coal-plants-not-reopening-under-trump/100641238/. Accessed April 25, 2017.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Can Longevity Truly Be Predicted?

By | Food for thought

Every morning, Emma Morano ate a raw egg and biscuits. When she died at age 117 in April of this year, she was the oldest person in the world. She lived in Verbania, a picturesque town situated on Lake Maggiore in northern Italy.1

Violet Brown, who was born in 1900 and lives in Jamaica, now holds the mantle as the world’s most senior senior.2 Like Morano, she resides in one of those beautiful locales that most of us only dream about. Could picturesque surroundings be a factor in longevity?

Surely happiness, time spent with good friends and family and a high quality of life can be factors. But no one really knows how long they’re going to live, which makes it particularly difficult to plan accurately for retirement income.

According to the Society of Actuaries, men who reach age 65 can expect to live to an average age of 86 and women to 88 — but those are just averages.2 In reality, some won’t make it to their predictive age and others will live longer. Which will you be?

As financial advisors, we understand the dilemma of planning for the unknown because it’s what we do every day. If we can help you develop a retirement plan, please contact us for a financial review. We can help you stay focused on your long-term goals and work with you to design a specific plan using a variety of insurance and investment products that help you work toward your desired financial future.

One tool to estimate your lifespan is the Actuaries Longevity Illustrator. Based on a few simple questions regarding health and demographic characteristics, it offers a series of percentages predicting your chances of living to various ages.3

If that’s too broad in nature, you might enjoy completing a more detailed questionnaire at the Biological-Age calculator. Based on how healthy a lifestyle you lead, this calculator knocks years off your current age for an estimate of how well your body is holding up.4

The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator (livingto100.com), which was developed by Dr. Thomas Perls, of the New England Centenarian Study, asks 40 questions about health and family history to help estimate how long you may live based on researched medical and scientific data.5

If you’re concerned about getting older, here’s a bit of good news: People tend to get happier as they age. In a poll earlier this year, people age 70 and older said their quality of life has improved as they’ve aged.6 This could reflect the sentiment many people feel who either never enjoyed working or are simply happy to stop.

Either way, it’s probably more uplifting to stop thinking about the limitations of getting older, and reflect more on the advantages we can enjoy that were denied us at younger ages.

 

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications

1 Sean Rossman. USA Today. April 15, 2017. “World’s oldest person, last known to be born in 1800s dies.” https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/04/15/worlds-oldest-person-last-known-born-1800s-dies/100501238/. Accessed April 18, 2017.
2 Mark Miller. The New York Times. Feb. 18, 2017. “How to Make Your Money Last as Long as You Do.” https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/18/your-money/retiring-longevity-planning-social-security.html?_r=0. Accessed April 18, 2017.
3 Society of Actuaries. 2017. “Actuaries Longevity Illustrator.” http://www.longevityillustrator.org/. Accessed April 18, 2017.
4 Biological Age. 2017. “Find Your Biological Age.” http://www.biological-age.com/#. Accessed April 18, 2017.
5 Dr. Thomas Perls. 2017. “Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator.” . Accessed April 18, 2017.
6 Matt Sedensky. The Detroit News. March 22, 2017. “Poll: As people move toward old age, optimism sets in.” http://www.detroitnews.com/story/life/wellness/2017/03/22/poll-old-age-optimism/99485000/. Accessed April 18, 2017.

This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Tax Reform: What’s On The Docket

By | Food for thought

From: AE Wealth Management

With a Republican president and the GOP controlling both houses of Congress, all the chess pieces are in place for meaningful tax reform. President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan have each introduced proposals featuring reduced rates for individual and corporate taxes. While corporate tax reform enjoys broad bipartisan support, both sides of the aisle have grave concerns about how to pay for lower household income taxes.

Click here to read more…

The Power of Going Green

By | Planning

 Here’s a new twist to the renewable energy and save the planet story: The Kentucky Coal Mining Museum in Benham, Kentucky, has recently switched from coal to solar power to help save on operational costs.1

It just goes to show you that the power struggle over power may be better energized by not making it an “either/or” (traditional vs. renewable sources) conflict. Individuals might consider looking at their financial strategy in much the same way. For example, there are financial vehicles retirees traditionally use for income, such as government bonds, Treasury bills, CDs and money market accounts. But given the potential for higher inflation in the future and today’s longer lifespans, there is a greater call for incorporating growth opportunity in a retiree’s financial strategy.

This poses a challenging situation in that more growth potential generally involves more market risk. However, there are alternative options, such as insurance products, that can capture some of the gains of equity markets while protecting your principal from market losses, and we’d be happy to discuss them with you. Like the energy sources debate, a financial strategy may be best served by incorporating a combination of both traditional and alternative solutions.

While recent news for the coal-mining industry indicates a positive turn2, many experts believe that if the U.S. doesn’t continue to make substantial investments in renewable energy sources, we could fall behind in global competition.3 In fact, the global investment in renewable power in 2015 was more than twice that invested in new coal- and natural-gas-fired power generation. China alone represented 36 percent of that total investment.4

Speaking of global efforts, consider some of the ways other parts of the world are going green. For example, German households don’t just separate trash between garbage and recyclables; the average home has five different bins for dispersing paper, packaging, glass, compost and trash.5

And finally, studies in green trends have revealed positive effects on our health, particularly in the health of women. Research by Harvard Medical School found that women who lived among higher levels of green vegetation had lower rates of mortality. The study found that higher exposure to green landscapes was associated with lower levels of depression and increased levels of social engagement and physical activity.6

These factors may have a significant impact on longer lifespans. But it’s also interesting to note the vegetation correlation — plants have been found to remove pollutants, making them natural air filters.7 This may explain why women in the study who were continuously exposed to green environments were less likely to die of a respiratory disease.8 That’s one green benefit that can help you breathe easier.

 

 

 

Content prepared by Kara Stefan Communications.

1 Fox News. April 6, 2017. “Kentucky Coal Mining Museum Switches to Solar Power.” http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/04/06/kentucky-coal-mining-museum-switches-to-solar-power.html. Accessed April 8, 2017.

2 John Kemp. Fortune. April 7, 2017. “Look for Coal and Mining Jobs to Come Back This Year” http://fortune.com/2017/04/07/coal-mining-jobs/. Accessed April 8, 2017.

3 Nick Stockton. Wired. March 16, 2017. “Clean Energy Could Spark a Trade War Between the US And China.” https://www.wired.com/2017/03/us-china-clean-energy/. Accessed April 8, 2017.

4 Jeff Nesbit. US News & World Report. March 15, 2017. “Clean Energy Is Seeing Monumental Job Growth.” https://www.usnews.com/news/at-the-edge/articles/2017-03-15/clean-energy-is-seeing-explosive-job-growth-dont-let-budget-kill-it. Accessed April 8, 2017.

5 Perfect Rubber Mulch. 2017. “Recycling Across the Globe.” https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5548ed90e4b0b0a763d0e704/t/58e69d90b8a79bf113147752/1491508625841/TheGlobe_by_GiuMagnani-2.jpg. Accessed April 8, 2017.

6 Elizabeth Pegg Frates, MD. Harvard Medical School. March 9, 2017. “Time Spent in ‘Green’ Places Linked With Longer Life in Women.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/time-spent-green-places-linked-longer-life-women-2017030911152?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=030917&utm_content=blog. Accessed April 8, 2017.

7 Melanie Pinola. Life Hacker. May 20, 2015. “This Graphic Shows the Best Air-Cleaning Plants, According to NASA.” http://lifehacker.com/this-graphic-shows-the-best-air-cleaning-plants-accord-1705307836. Accessed April 13, 2017.

8 Elizabeth Pegg Frates, MD. Harvard Medical School. March 9, 2017. “Time Spent in ‘Green’ Places Linked With Longer Life in Women.” http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/time-spent-green-places-linked-longer-life-women-2017030911152?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=030917&utm_content=blog. Accessed April 8, 2017.

 

 

Guarantees and protections provided by insurance products including annuities are backed by the financial strength and claims-paying ability of the issuing insurance carrier.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values. 

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

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Best Laid Plans: What Can Derail Retirement?

By | Planning

From: AE Wealth Management

We often fall into a trap where we think we have all the bases covered. Take retirement planning, for example. You can plan for the lifestyle you want. You can plan for the income you need. You can even stash away extra funds for unexpected expenses retirees typically encounter. But can you truly plan for every variable?

There are many threats than can derail even the most solid retirement plan. Here are three of the most common:

1. Underestimating income needs

2. Withdrawing more money than you should

3. Overexposure to market risk

Should your retirement plan misfire on any of these fronts, you could outlive your savings.

Piecing together an accurate retirement plan is a little like putting together a puzzle without having the finished picture to refer to: You don’t know if you’ve got it right until you get to the end.

Too often, people don’t realize they missed a base until they’re rounding their way to home plate.

To Read More Click Here.

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